Posts Tagged ‘pianist’

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Lou Hooper Piano

October 24, 2010

Name: Lou Hooper (Louis Stanley)
Release: Piano
Format: Vinyl, LP, Album
Year: 1973
Genre: Jazz
Label: Radio Canada International
Catalog#: RCI 380

Role:  Pianist, composer
Home: Chatham Kent (North Buxton)
Life: May 18th 1894 – Sept 17th 1977

Album Track List
A1   Blame It On The Blues 
A2   In A Mist  
A3   Canadian Capers  
A4   South Sea Strut   
A5   Russian Rag   
A6   Scene From An Imaginary Ballet (SC. 4) 
B1   Scene From An Imaginary Ballet (SC. 2)  
B2   Black Cat Blues  
B3   Spring Fever 
B4   Cakewalk 
B5   Alaskan Rag 
B6   Uncle Remus Stomp

  His father took him at three to Ypsilanti, Mich, where he sang solos in church and at 12 played the trombone in the Hooper Brothers Orchestra.
  While he was studying piano 1911-21 at the Detroit Cons, he played in various local dance and theatre orchestras.

  He lived 1921-7 in Harlem (New York), studying 1923-4 at the Martin-Smith Music School (a subsidiary of the Damrosch Institute – later the Juilliard School). He recorded with Elmer Snowden (banjo) and Bob Fuller (clarinet) under several names, eg, the Three Jolly Miners, the Three Monkey Chasers, for Vocalion, Columbia, etc and also backed the trumpeters Johnny Dunn and Louis Metcalf, the singers Ethel Waters, Ma Rainey, Mamie Smith, and other leading jazz and blues performers of the day. Hooper accompanied Paul Robeson on tour in 1926 and travelled as a member of Lew Leslie’s Blackbirds of 1928.

Hooper returned to Canada in 1932, living first in Toronto – he performed at the 1932 CNE – and then, as of 1933, in Montreal, where he joined Myron Sutton’s Canadian Ambassadors, an all-black dance band active in Quebec and Ontario. Hooper formed and conducted a male choir, the Hooper Southern Singers, in concerts and on CKAC radio. He also played in local dance and jazz bands and taught piano. Oscar Peterson was one of his pupils. After a term in Europe during World War II with the Royal Canadian Artillery in which he served mainly as a pianist and entertainer in charge of Canadian concert parties, Hooper returned to Montreal, playing and teaching in increasing obscurity.

In 1962 he was rediscovered by Montreal jazz enthusiasts and subsequently celebrated as a surviving link to the early history of recorded jazz. He was honored by the International Association of Record Collectors in 1973 and by the Canadian Congress of Collectors in 1977. A new recording, the LP Lou Hooper (1973, RCI 380), a collection of ragtime pieces, included his own Black Cat Blues, The Cakewalk, South Sea Strut, and Uncle Remus Stomp. According to Tex Wyndam in Coda (March 1976): ‘Although slightly on the academic and restrained side, the solos have a firm, bright rhythm, are cleanly executed, and generate a mood of confidence and good cheer’. Other Hooper rags date to as late as 1975, the year in which he joined the faculty of the University of Prince Edward Island. He also wrote a ballet, Congo, staged in 1976. In the summer before his death he was a regular performer on CBC (Halifax) TV’s ‘The Old-Fashioned New-Fangled Vaudeville Show’.
Source.

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Laura Moelker (2009)

November 16, 2009

Name: Laura Moelker
CD Release: Unfolding Stories
Year: 2009
Performance: classical concert pianist
Home: Chatham-Kent
Resides: Hamilton

Notes: The CD is a collection of classical piano music from Chopin, Mendelssohn, Gershwin, and Schubert.

Official Bio
  Laura Moelker, a native of Chatham, Ontario, is a classical concert pianist with a profound love for music. Her outgoing personality, remarkable enthusiasm and precision at the piano have given her enormous success and praise from audiences.

  Laura grew up in Chatham, Ontario where she began taking piano lessons at the age of 5. Born into a musical family, Laura received unending support from her parents and siblings. She continued taking lessons and received numerous awards in local music festivals, including the O.R.M.T.A. award, which she received in 1999. This only encouraged Laura to continue in her musical studies. In 2002 Laura moved to Hamilton, Ontario where she continued studying music at Redeemer University College under Dr. Christiaan Teeuwsen and world-renowned pianist, Valerie Tryon. In May 2006 she graduated with a Bachelor of Arts in music (piano performance). Upon graduating Laura continued her classical training with the Royal Conservatory of Music and in January 2009 graduated and received her ARCT diploma in piano performance.

  Laura now works as a freelance musician in Hamilton, Ontario and is currently involved in various musical activities within her local community.

Visit Laura online here.   
Listen to her music here

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Jamie Hillman (2009)

October 28, 2009
jamiehillman_2009

Jamie

Name: Jamie Hillman
Year: 2009
From Chatham-Kent

Note: Catch Jamie live Nov.20th 2009 at the Kiwanis Theatre in Chatham.

  Jamie Hillman is an award-winning singer, pianist, composer, and conductor. He holds an ARCT diploma (Piano Performance) from the Royal Conservatory of Music, the Bachelor of Music degree (Honors Music Education with concentrations in both voice and piano) from the University of Western Ontario, the Master of Music degree (Choral Conducting and Literature) from the University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, as well as certificates from Conservatory Canada. His list of teachers include Kevin McMillan, Tina Yanchus-Hibbard, Dr. Chester Alwes, and Dr. Ollie Watts Davis.

  As a tenor soloist, Mr. Hillman performed Handel’s Messiah and Haydn’s Creation with the Laudate Dominum Choir and Orchestra and Shuetz’s St. Matthew Passion with the Prairie Masterworks Chorale and Red Deer College Chamber Choir. He can be heard regularly on the Sunday morning radio show “Songs for the Heart.”

  A highly sought-after collaborative pianist, Mr. Hillman has shared the stage with many singers, including the internationally-renowned baritone, Kevin McMillan. In 2004, he worked as Apprentice Accompanist at the Berkshire Choral Festival in Massachusetts.

  Mr. Hillman’s choral compositions have been premiered and performed by a number of ensembles. His well-known composition, Who Would Have Thought?, was recorded by Les Choristes (University of Western Ontario), and garnered praise and discussion in an article in the International Journal of Education & the Arts. His Psalm was given its European premiere by the Nathaniel Dett Chorale.

  A noted conductor, Mr. Hillman recently served as Assistant Conductor of both the University of Illinois Concert Choir and Black Chorus. His tenure with the Concert Choir included conducting the ensemble at numerous venues while touring Hawaii where he also copresented a lecture-recital at the Hawaii International Conference on Arts and Humanities. He is the founder and former director of the award-winning Chatham-Kent Treble Choir.

  A young, enthusiastic pedagogue, Mr. Hillman has held appointments at several institutions, including Prairie Bible College, where he currently teaches. His students frequently win awards at competitions and have gained admission into post-secondary music programs in both Canada and the United States. In the summer of 2006, he served as a Faculty-Artist member at StudiO: the Ollie Watts Davis Vocal Institute and as Vocal Director at Camp-of-the-Woods in New York. Recent adjudicating engagements have taken him to music festivals in Lacombe and Sherwood Park, Alberta. Mr. Hillman is a member of the National Association of Teachers of Singing, the Association of Canadian Choral Conductors, and Chorus America.