Posts Tagged ‘bio’

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Elyse Weinberg 2001

October 10, 2011

Artist: Elyse Weinberg (born Cori Bishop)
Release: Elyse
Year: 2001 (Re-Release from 1968)
Genre: psych folk rock
Born: Chatham Ontario Canada
Website: here.
Buy the Album: here.

Track Listing:
1. Last Ditch Protocol
2. Deed I Do
3. Iron Works
4. Spirit of the Letter
5. Here in My Heart
6. Band of Thieves
7. Sweet Pounding Rhythm
8. Meet Me at the Station
9. Simpleminded Harlequin
10. Painted Raven
11. Mortuary Bound
12. If Death Don’t Overtake Me
13. House (Featuring Neil Young)
14. What You Call It
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* Watch the preview of this album below.

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Notes: This is a reissue of this 1968 psychedelic classic.
“Elyse” actually received much critical acclaim, and while not a commercial hit, the record sold fairly well, even prompting an appearance on Johnny Carson’s “Tonight Show”. Two more albums were recorded but never released. Included on this CD reissue are two songs from this era, one of which, “Houses”, features Neil Young wielding his distinctively ripping guitar sound.

Elyse got her start performing in Toronto alongside friends like Neil Young and Joni Mitchell. She later moved to LA where she recorded “Elyse”, and has since lived in London, New Mexico, and Ashland, Oregon where she currently lives.  She still writes and plans to record an album of new material in the near future.  Since, Elyse’s story has become something of a rock legend – after the rerelease her album received massive amount of positive feedback in the press, and she was mentioned in Magnet, Time Out NY, Aquarium Drunkard, Creative Loafing (amongst others). Perhaps the most flattering result was two extremely successful indie bands, Vetiver and Dinosaur Jr. decided to cover “Houses” in the aftermath of the re-release.

Notes: Cher recorded the song “Band of Thieves” without giving credit to Elyse. She remembers going to the movies with her friends to see Cher’s movie and to hear Cher’s version of her song “Band of Thieves”. When the credits came on it said all music by Sonny Bono, She was shocked.

 

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chatham_music_archive@hotmail.com

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Chatham Music Archive Article 2009

November 18, 2009

Click to enlarge

‘BAND’ING Together
Posted By ELLWOOD SHREVE
Chatham Daily News Nov.14th 2009

If you have a favourite local band still playing or from when you were younger, try checking out the website www.chathammusicarchive.com created by Shawn Beaulieu.
In a short period of time, the 35-year-old Chatham resident has compiled an impressive amount of information on local bands and musicians, including photos and small biographies, which are listed by both name and year released.
Beaulieu began the project about four or five years ago as a blog, but since being laid off six months ago, he has been able to devote several hours a day to the website.
“All of a sudden it turned into more than a hobby and all of a sudden it got bigger and bigger,” Beaulieu said.
He has been a part of the local music scene as a member of the band Foster Child, which became the Janet Theory.
Beaulieu credits the help he has received from Jeff Mifflin, who works at Strings N’ Things and is the guitarist with The O’Hara Brothers band. He said Mifflin was able to access photos of several local bands that have been displayed at the local music store over the years. He also noted the members of the 1980s group Manpower, which have teamed up again this year, “got me into a lot of this.” Beaulieu said the website is getting the attention of several local musicians, past and present, noting people have been coming to him with information. Beaulieu is impressed with the wealth of musical talent and the wide range of genres that has come out of the Chatham-Kent area, and wanted a way to show that to the world.
He has done extensive research at the Chatham Public Library, gathering information dating back to 1889 with the formation of the Chatham City Band. There is plenty of interesting information on well-known older bands, including the Melody Ramblers, which once boasted current country music star Michelle Wright as its lead singer. When Wright left to pursue a solo career, she was replaced by Wendy Jenkins, who also enjoyed success with the popular band. Then there is The Missing Links, including members John, Fred and Eddy Larson and Bill McGrath, whose 1966 album “It’s Link Up Time,” was produced by Paul Shaffer, best known today for his long stint with the David Letterman Show.

The site is also filling up with information on several local bands from today’s era. Beaulieu said the website can also serve as a resource for bands that are looking for musicians with certain skills or local clubs that want to hire local bands to play. “I only knew about 10 per cent of the bands when I started doing this,” Beaulieu said. “There’s a big scene going on, but nobody knows each other.”

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The Laws – Ride it Out CD (2007)

July 24, 2009

Artists: The Laws
Releases:  Ride It Out
Year: 2007
Connection: John Law was born in Chatham Ontario.

John Law – vocals, guitar, mandolin
Michele Law – vocals, bass

Note: Recorded in Nashville with producer Regie Hamm.  The Laws trademark “tight-as-a-glove” harmony singing is highlighted throughout the 11 songs.

…..Cut to 2007, and John and Michele are not only husband and wife but are also partners in music, performing as The Laws and getting ready to make a strong move for greater recognition in the Americana ranks in this country behind a typically ambitious touring schedule (200-plus nights a year on the road) and a stirring new album for their own label, JML Music, titled Ride It Out. The duo’s fifth long player, Ride It Out is noticeably lacking any false notes in its compelling original songs, empathetic musicianship and emotionally charged vocal performances.

   Recorded in Nashville with producer/writer Regie Hamm, and co-written with some of Music City’s top tunesmiths, Ride It Out showcases all the Laws’ strengths. Stylistically its songs range far and wide within a roots framework. Smooth country folk powers the album opening “Am I Still the One”; “Put Some Love Into It” is a jazz -tinged frolic keyed by Michele’s saucy vocal; the guitar-mandolin instrumental “Texacadia” is a Nickel Creek-style display of assured, hot pickin’; the classic country-tinged “Too Lonesome to Cry” features lyrics as simple, direct and devastating as the Steve Earle of “Valentine’s Day” and “Hometown Blues”; and, to close things out, “Getting Over You” is a bopping little folk-flavored ditty that evinces an ironic, Steve Goodman-like sense of the absurd in its account of someone doing everything but getting over a lost love. Vocally, Michele ranges from a soothing, plaintive, Emmylou Harris-like harmony (“Am I Still the One”) to assertive, Martina McBride-style belting (“Getting Over You”), whereas John’s rich, nasally tenor bears some semblance to that of the estimable Texas craftsman and New Traditionalist pioneer Radney Foster. And despite the presence of a few other players on the album, Ride It Out has the intimate feel of a Laws stage show, where the only sounds come from the duo’s voices and instruments.

   John and Michele, who have become accustomed to living in their van (in fact, their personal possessions are in storage in Canada; they are, in essence, homeless), have made a commitment of sorts by putting down roots in Nashville, where they have rented an apartment and have signed a publishing deal with SWITR, Inc.

Not least of the Laws’ selling points is their acumen in the kitchen. They published a cookbook and have appeared on numerous cooking shows through the years, generating almost as much press for their culinary skills as for their music. They also offer shows that are part cooking workshop, part musical performance. This sprang from their determination to eat healthy while touring constantly.
Cooking or music? Music or cooking? At one point that might have been a tossup. Now, however, with the assured, resonant performances on exhibit on Ride It Out, it appears the Laws are really ready to start cooking. But not in the kitchen

Video mix from TV and live footage.

If video does not appear, watch it here.

Visit them here, here and here.

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Ian And Sylvia Debut Release (1962)

May 31, 2009

Ian & Sylvia1962

Artist: Ian And Sylvia
Release: Ian And Sylvia
Date: 1962
Sylvia is from Chatham. Born Sylvia Fricker.

Tracks:
01. rocks and gravel
02. old blue
03. c.c. rider
04. un canadien errant
05. handsome molly
06. mary anne
07. pride of petrovar
08. makes a long time man feel bad
09. rambler gambler
10. down by the willow garden
11. got no more home than a dog
12. when first unto this country
13. live a-humble
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* Watch/listen to the preview below.

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Ian Sylvia’s debut album is their most standard affair, and indeed a fairly typical contemporary folk recording, with such traditional warhorses as “Rocks and Gravel” (also recorded, but not released, by Dylan during the same time), “C.C. Rider,” and “Handsome Molly.” What made the pair immediately distinctive was their superb vocal dueting, which was definitely a case of the sum being greater than its parts. Blended together, they canceled each other’s weaknesses and gave the material great freshness and vigor. Ian’s guitar and Sylvia’s autoharp are backed by stellar playing from guitarist John Herald and string bassists Bill Lee (director Spike Lee’s father) and Art Davis. ~ Richie Unterberger, All Music Guide

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   Ian & Sylvia were Canada’s first folk act to command a large international following from their humble beginnings in the 1950’s. After a hospital stay from his career in professional rodeos, Ian had time to learn guitar. He became a regular performer at the Heidelberg Cafe in Vancouver, British Columbia starting in 1956. He would later move on as guitarist for Jerry Fyander And The Seasonal Stripes before relocating to Toronto in 1959 and hooking up with actor/singer Don Francks, and later, future wife Sylvia Fricker.

Sylvia had grown up in Chatham, Ontario and eventually headed to Toronto to pursue her life ambition as a folk singer. By late 1959 Ian & Sylvia had teamed up as musical collaborators/performers and played at the Mariposa Folk Festival for the first time in 1961.

From there they would go on to folk clubs in New York where they met Albert Grossman (Bob Dylan’s manager) who would send them through the Catskills Circuit, Chicago and Detroit. He eventually became their manager and landed them a with US based Vanguard Records. Their debut album from 1962, ‘Ian & Sylvia’, did nothing if not make them a fixture of the early 60’s folk boom.

The duo continued their remarkable rise in popularity and were inspired by the success of Dylan. Ian managed to write what would become one of the most famous of all folk songs, “Four Strong Winds”, after hearing Dylan do “Blowin’ In The Wind” in 1964. The duo were married the same year and continued working the college circuit.

Though not hits for the duo, both “Four Strong Winds” and Sylvia’s first composition ever, “You Were On My Mind”, were successes for Bobby Bare (1964) and the We Five (1965)/Crispen St. Peter (1966) respectively. The duo returned to Canada in 1964 and they had a son, Clay. Later, Sylvia would develop some throat problems leaving Ian to perform solo to make ends meet.

‘Play One More’, from early 1966, seemed like a cookie cutter collection of songs to fill the need for the public to consume more folk. That same year they released a second, ‘So Much For Dreaming’, which was a turn towards the pop mainstream with a few folk tunes thrown in.

Moving to MGM Records in 1967 they put out ‘The Lovin’ Sound’ before being informed by Vanguard that they owed that label one more album. Contractually obligated, Ian & Sylvia delivered 1969’s ‘Full Circle’ to Vanguard before resuming their new relationship with MGM for the ‘Nashville’ album.

By then their folk approach had almost completely been buried and a distinct country style had taken its place. As a means to explore this and other musical genres, the duo formed a free-form country-jazz instrumental experiment called The Great Speckled Bird which featured some of the hottest session players in the business – David Wilcox (guitar); Ben Keith (steel guitar), Jeff Gutcheon (piano), Jim Colegrove (bass) and N.D. Smart (drums).

The public reaction was scornful but high profile live events like the Atlanta Pop Festival and Festival Express 1970 received better response and so they were inspired to release an album. ‘The Great Speckled Bird’ was produced by Todd Rundgren and released on Ampex. Immediately, the public showed their dislike with their pocket books and the band had to come off tour due to lack of album sales and eventually the album’s unavailability due to Ampex folding.

Ian would soon be asked to host CTV-TV’s ‘Nashville North’ television show which would frequently feature appearances by Sylvia over the course of five years. Sylvia took on the position of hosting CBC Radio’s ‘Touch The Earth’ and in 1973 was signed to a solo record deal with Capitol.

Ian would be signed to A & M and eventually Stony Plain and pursued the on-again off-again Great Speckled Bird project. The duo played their final public performance in 1975 and The Great Speckled Bird disbanded a year later.

The duo eventually were divorced and have maintained a friendship ever since. They reunited for a CBC-TV special and live performance at Kingswood Music Theatre in 1986.

with notes from James M. Castro.

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