Posts Tagged ‘time’

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Time Is A Hymn 2013

December 22, 2013
Timeisahymn_2013

Matt, Joe, Kyle, & Frank.

Band: Time Is A Hymn
Year: 2013
Year formed: 2011
Home: Chatham Ontario Canada
Genre: Rock

Members:
Matt Sullivan – vocals, guitar
Frank E. Fitz - vocals, guitar
Kyle Piva – bass
Joe Carson - Drums, Percussion

Notes:
The band has suffered a few incarnations since 2011 but the same vibe and style remains. They have been releasing demo songs over the last few years. Frank also performs with the grave misunderstanding & Joe drums for the party cover band Face 4 Radio.

Internet released demos:
* kill the Weak
* G.E.M
* the new conspiracy
* The Universe Stands Still
* Unseen
* Not This Time
* Carelessly

Links:
* Soundcloud.com.
* Reverbnation.com.
* Twitter.com.

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Time EP Release 2009

November 13, 2013

Band: Time
Release: Time E.P.
Year: 2009
Genre: Rock
Formed: 2006

Local connection: Pat Wilken & Ryan Watson are from Erieau. The band was Windsor based until moving to Toronto in 2010.
Time later changed their name to TimeGiant.

Tracks:
1. White Window
2. Candy From A Feather
3. The Pressure
4. Counter Clockwise

Links:
Official Website here.
Itunes link for this EP here.
CBC link here.

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Elyse Weinberg 2009

October 10, 2011

Artist: Elyse Weinberg (AKA Cori Bishop)
Release: In My Own Sweet Time
Year: 2009
Genre: Folk, Alternative Folk
Born: Chatham Ontario Canada
Website: here.
Preview or buy the Album: here.

Track Listing:
1. Anybody Out There?
2. Break It Wide Open
3. Hey My Baby
4. Remind Me
5. Operator
6. Darlin’
7. The Shining One
8. Sleepwalker
9. Nothin’s Gonna Change
10. All Is Well

Produced by Cori Bishop & John Swinnerton at Sonic Sojourns, Ashland, Oregon.

Notes:
The Holy Grail. That’s how Andrew Rieger of Elf Power described the moment in 1999 when he first listened to Elyse’s long forgotten 1968 self-titled release. Back in the late ’60′s, the album received quite a bit of attention – so much so that Elyse appeared on Johnny Carson’s Tonight Show, in Newsweek and the L.A. Free Press, and at Shaffer Music Festival in NYC. She continued to write and record for Asylum Records. Cut to 30 years later when Rieger fell so much in love with her debut album that he contacted Elyse (now going by the name Cori Bishop and living in Ashland, Ore.).

The rest is history – Orange Twin rereleased the self-titled debut, along with two other of her songs from that era, one of which, “Houses,” features Neil Young wielding his distinctively ripping guitar sound. Since, Elyse’s story has become something of a rock legend – after the rerelease her album received massive amount of positive feedback in the press, and she was mentioned in Magnet, Time Out NY, Aquarium Drunkard, Creative Loafing (amongst others). Perhaps the most flattering result was two extremely successful indie bands, Vetiver and Dinosaur Jr. decided to cover “Houses” in the aftermath of the release.

Now, after playing extensively over the past few years, which included a date at Montreal Pop Festival in 2008, Elyse has recorded a new album for the first time since the late ’60′s – the aptly titled “In My Own Sweet Time.” Elyse’s voice is still captivating – at once sweet and melodic, while also sounding edgy and ragged, brimming with a sense of hope and liberation. As Andrew Rieger said, it’s scary and magical stuff, which is particularly captured in the album’s first single “Anybody Out There?”

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Send your pictures & info to : Email us:
chatham_music_archive@hotmail.com

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Fred S. Stone – Ma Ragtime Baby(1893)

June 3, 2009

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Fred S. Stone  (1873 ~ 1912)
Home Town: Chatham Ontario
Year: 1893


   Fred S. Stone was a relatively prolific composer of ragtime music. Stone was born in Chatham, Ontario, nine years before Geoffrey O’Hara.. The fact of his Canadian birth is not well known since the (relatively few) references to him in the ragtime literature is as an “African-American” composer.

  The remarkable Stone inherited the musical leadership of Detroit from the equally remarkable “Old Man” Theo Finney. The latter had started a music business in the Michigan city during the Civil War, and from that beginning had built up a formidable musical dynasty. Finney’s – and then Stone’s – orchestras monopolized the Detroit Entertainment and social world to the almost complete exclusion of white performers.

  Fred S. Stone and his stalwart colleagues . . . unionized the Detroit musicians and built the fine headquarters and club that are still in use. It was the white players who had to petition for admission to the union, apparently the only local in the country where this was the case.

  Jasen and Jones (2000:320) give 1912 as the date that Stone died; however, Blesh and Janis (1966:105) state that “Fred S. Stone died in the middle 1930′s.”

  Note: Ragtime music: the jaunty, toe-tapping music that captivated American society from the 1890s through World War I, forms the roots of America s popular musical expression. But the understanding of ragtime and its era has been clouded by a history of murky impressions, half-truths, and inventive fictions.

   First use of the word Ragtime appears in the song title “Ma Ragtime Baby” by Fred Stone in 1893.

   Fred S. Stone was a cross-border phenomenon in the music world, famous in both Detroit and Canada. In fact, in spite of his dominance in music circles in early 20th century Detroit, Stone was actually born in Chatham, Ontario, making him Canadian by birth, and technically not African-American. He owed a lot of his early success to violinist Theodore Finney, sometimes referred to as “Old Man” Finney. Mr. Finney had done fairly well as an orchestra leader in the latter part of the 19th century in Detroit, and one of his star players was W. “Jack” Johnson, a cornetist. Johnson himself had been in the Detroit City Band with Finney, then spent some time touring the south in the late 1880s with the Georgia Minstrels. When he returned, he started the Johnson Cornet Band which provided a training ground for many young black musicians in Detroit, including Stone who had come across the border by the mid 1890s with his brothers.

   Fred started composing pieces for publication in 1895, mostly dance numbers, but hit it big in 1898 with Ma Ragtime Baby, further increasing sales when his brother Charles added words for a song version. The following year he made a splash with Bos’n Rag. Between this and his considerable musicianship he quickly gained the respect of musicians throughout Detroit.

     In Stone’s capacity as an arranger and leader in Finney’s orchestra, the group became one of the earliest in the country to play ragtime. The old man did not favor this newer music, and whenever they played in some of the downtown establishments where ragtime was popular, he usually chose to not participate.

  Finney died in 1899, and very soon Stone took the group over by some acclaim from the members. He then hired a replacement for Finney, violinist Jack Shook. While the two co-conducted the orchestra mutually for some time, eventually they ended up in court deciding who would be able to use the well-established Finney name for the groups each of them ended up leading, with Shook finally taking the prize. Stone continued to lead his own groups, and recorded several pieces of ragtime and other genres for some of the earliest popular records. A few his own compositions were also recorded by other groups, including the Edison Concert Band who did Belle of the Philippines.

  During this period he also turned out a number pieces that were as intriguing and varietal as that of one of his Detroit counterparts, Harry P. Guy, including a lovely set of waltzes titled Silks and Rags, and a lively almost-rag title, Belinda. He was so busy with the union and playing engagements that little was composed or published after that time, perhaps only existing as band arrangements. Stone died in 1912 at approximately 39-years-old, although the cause of death and a concrete determination of the date have been hard to pin down. His contributions to ragtime performance and music in general in what would become the city of “Motown” were significant, and even may have prompted Harry Guy’s comment that “you might almost say that Ragtime was born in Detroit.” Not quite, but it did thrive there for some time.
Compositions

1895 - The Indian: Two Step -  [w/Edward Liggett]
1896 – La Albecite: Spanish Waltzes – Mackinac March
1898 – The Cardinal March – A Lady of Quality (Waltzes) – Ma Ragtime Baby
              Ma Ragtime Baby (Song) -  [w/Charles H. Stone]
1899 – The Bos’n Rag -  1900 – Elseeta
1901 – Silks and Rags (Waltzes)
1902 – Sue
1903 – Belle of the Philippines – A Kangaroo Hop
1905 – Belinda
1908 – Melody at Twilight – Stone’s Barn Dance

Sources:
http://www.ragtimepiano.ca/rags/can2.htm
http://www.perfessorbill.com/ragtime4_alt.shtml

2009 – Below Video of Ragtime Skedaddlers performing “Ma Ragtime Baby” by Fred S. Stone

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