Archive for the ‘1965 Music’ Category

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Dan Dalton 1965

May 10, 2010

Group:  The Back Porch Majority
Release: Meet the Back Porch Majority
Year: 1965
Format: LP
Genre: Folk
Record Label: Epic

Chatham-Kent Connection: Dan Dalton is from Erieau. He performed with his brothers in a group before this band. He later became a record producer and eventually ran his own production company (Dan Dalton Productions) His first crack at writing, pitching and performing in a commercial (It was for Mazda) won him a top industry award. S.Beaulieu

While attending the University of Hawaii, Dan Dalton became a professional musician as a member of a trio called the Dalton Boys, with his brothers Wally and Jack. The trio was booked to open Randy Sparks’ new club, Ledbetter’s, in October of 1963, and when his brothers were drafted and the act broke up, Dalton joined the Back Porch Majority, playing banjo and 12-string guitar. ~ Bruce Eder, All Music Guide

Tracks:
1 Friends, 2 Silver Dollar, 3 Billy, Don’t Play the Banjo, 4 Long Time Ago, 5 Julianne, 6 Ladies Auxiliary Barn Dance Saturday Night, 7 Cotton Bale Levee, 8 Lewis and Clark County Fair, 9 The Far Side of the Hill, 10 Whistle, Maggie, 11 Hand-Me-Down Things, 12 Ol’ Dan Tucker

Performers:
Dan Dalton, Kin Vassy, Karen Brian, Michael Crowley, Lois Fletcher, Ellen Whalen, Michael Clough

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Zeke and the Moonshiners

May 2, 2010

Click pic to enlarge

Band: Grant Smith and The Power
Year: 1965
Genre: Country-rock act
Home: Chatham/London based

Members:
Eddy Larsen
(Ole) – Vocals, lead guitar
John Larsen – Bass
Freddy Larsen – Organ
Waide Holland – Keyboards
Grant Smith – Drums (London Ontario)

Note: They were a great rowdy party band that dressed up as hillbillies and kept the crowds hollering to their crazy on stage antics. They were a weekend band while the members worked day jobs. Waide was the young one finishing his last year of high school. The Larsen brothers decided to quit their day jobs and pursue music full time and change their band name a few times before settling as The Missing Links.
The Missing Links were together for 11 years and spent a good 4-5 years playing in Toronto without ever having to leave there. They were a hot band and were very well in demand.
Grant Smith was the drummer for ‘Zeke’ the first couple of years. Grant went on to form the popular Toronto rock-soul outfit “Grant Smith and the Power” that had a hit with a cover of Jackie Edwards’ “Keep On Running” (previously a big hit for The Spencer Davis Group). Grant Smith & The Power opened for The Hollies and Spanky & Our Gang at Toronto’s O’Keefe Centre on March 17, 1968. The following month, the band headed off for another US trip, supporting the likes of Janis Joplin, Traffic and Rare Earth.

Here is a little something from a 2009 interview with Drummer Grant Smith about Zeke and the Moonshiners/ The Missing Links by Lisa Mcdonald.

The band consisted of three brothers from Denmark.  Their father was a professional musician but decided to move the family here to become beet farmers.  But once the boys started playing in a band on weekends, they decided playing music was far more lucrative than being beet farmers.  Their father went back to Denmark and the boys went on the road.  We were called Zeke and the Moonshiners.  They were really good musicians but after about a month or so, I convinced them to drop the comedy and change our name to The Missing Links.  We covered material by Roy Orbison and Frank Highfield.  We were a good rock and roll band made better by traveling to Todd’s Men’s Wear in Detroit and buying suits.

Did the band just tour Canada or did you cross borders?

It was just Ontario and Quebec then, but, (and George Olliver will disagree with this), we became the first white act recorded by Chess Records in Chicago.   We got a van and began working for an agent.  Agents had a circuit and if you worked with an agent, you worked all his clubs.  There were shitty clubs, mediocre clubs and really nice clubs.  I wanted to chase the money, so we had to travel a lot to play the really nice clubs.  We’d travel from Northern Quebec to Thunder Bay and from Thunder Bay to Belleville and Belleville to Montreal and Montreal to Windsor.  It was 1964 and we made more money in one week than my father did in an entire month.  It was great!

Interview Source: http://fyimusic.ca/opinion/part-3-grant-smith-with-lisa-mcdonald

Anyone with pics or info, please email:
chatham_music_archive@hotmail.com

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The Constels

April 29, 2010

Band: The Constels
Year: 1965
Formed: 1964
Home: Chatham

Members:
Roland Webster
- Organist
Bob Jacques – R. Guitar
Bob Niksich – Lead Guitar
Dave Henderson – Bass Guitar
Alan Nichols – Drums

Notes: This was a high school aged band that performed at dances.
Roland went to C.C.I. and the rest of the boys went to J.M.S.S.

Anyone with pics or info, please email:
chatham_music_archive@hotmail.com

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Guardsmen 1965

April 13, 2010

Duo: Guardsmen
Year: 1965
Genre: Folk
Raised: Wallaceburg Ontario

Members:
Ralph Murphy (Raised in Wallaceburg)
Jack Klaeysen

The duo began in 1964 as folk singers who also play the acoustic guitar & banjo.  Murphy, who was raised in Wallaceburg, left the community in 1965 to pursue a career in the music business and quite a career it’s been. He has earned a number of gold records for songwriting and producing and become one of the best-known people on the inside of the music industry.

Notes: 1965 – Ralph Murphy had his first UK Number One with ‘Call My Name’ recorded by James Royal. Back then Ralph was in a bunch of bands. He put out five albums as an artist. The last deal he had was just as Ralph Murphy solo, and that was 1974.

* At the start of the sixties, Murphy went to L.A., staying in Manhattan Beach and playing the coffeehouses down by the lighthouse.

* Murphy and his musical partner, Jack Klaeysen (a good guitarist from another school-days band) bought one-way tickets from New York and arrived in Liverpool on February 14, 1965. While on ship, they began playing in steerage. Word spread, and they were invited to first class. An agent named Collins heard them and gave them a referral to his brother, Joe Collins – an agent who initially managed the career of his daughter, Joan Collins – with a big agency in London. Murphy didn’t quite believe him – “I said, ‘Yeah, sure, pal,’ and stuck the card in my sock and kept playing for free drinks and carrying on with the actresses on board.”

*When they arrived in Liverpool, they looked for places to play and ended up at a club called the Birdcage.  One night, Gerry and the Pacemakers were present and one of the band members began to talk to them. “They said, ‘Hey, man, you guys are really good! What are you doing in Liverpool?’ We said, ‘Hey, this is where it’s at!’ ‘No, it’s not! There’s nothing here! You need to go to London!’”

*Within four months of arriving in London, they had a record deal. Their deal was with Tony Hatch, the already legendary producer and writer for Petula Clark, under his label Pye Records. While they were auditioning for Tony Hatch, “Roger Cook stumbled in and heard us playing and said, ‘You’re gonna sign them, right?’” That encounter was the start of a long and productive relationship between Murphy and Cook.

* Their first album, a folk effort, was as the Guardsmen. Their second album was pop, and they were renamed the Slade Brothers. They cut a couple of their own songs,and also cut a Roger Greenway/Roger Cook song called “What a Crazy Life” that became a hit in early 1966, when they first heard themselves on the radio on Radio Luxembourg.

*  In the fall of 1965, they signed a publishing deal with Mills Music, later Belwin Mills Publishing. Later that year, a song penned by Murphy and Klaeysen – “Call My Name” – was recorded by James Royal and became a hit. “It was earth-shaking, it was everything I wanted it to be. I was addicted,” recalls Murphy. “All I ever wanted to be was a stand-alone writer. I wanted to have everyone record my songs and I could sit and listen to them on the radio. I was
ready – bring it on!” The recording of that song also became the introduction for Murphy to another musical career – record producer.

*At that point, Murphy began getting work as a producer throughout town, including CBS, Decca, and Phillips.

Read More about Ralph here or his own page here.

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Ian And Sylvia – Early Mornin’ Rain (1965)

May 31, 2009

Artist: Ian And Sylvia
Release: Early Mornin’ Rain
Date: 1965
Label: Vanguard Records
Sylvia is from Chatham. Born Sylvia Fricker.

    Their fourth album, Early Morning Rain, consisted in large part of contemporary compositions. They introduced the work of fellow Canadian songwriter and performer Gordon Lightfoot through the title song as well a cover version of “For Loving Me”. They also covered “Darcy Farrow” by Steve Gillette and Tom Campbell, being the first artists to cover these three songs. Additionally, they recorded a number of their own compositions.

Tracks:
1. Come In Stranger
2. Early Morning Rain 
3. Nancy Whiskey
4. Awake Ye Drousy Sleepers
5. Marlborough Street Blues
6. Darcy Farrow
7. Travelling Drummer  
8. Maude’s Bluese 
9. Red Velvet
10. I’Ll Bid My Heart Be Stil  
11. For Lovin’ Mee 
12. Song For Canada

Listen or buy it here or here.

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Ian And Sylvia – Northern Journey (1965)

May 30, 2009
Cover
Cover

Ian & Sylvia Tyson
Release: Northern Journey
Date: 1965
Label: Vanguard Records
Sylvia is from Chatham

   The distinctively blended voices of Ian & Sylvia Tyson define the essence of the 1960’s folk music sound. These Juno Award Hall of Famers became popular in the United States at the start of the 60’s folk revival, paving the way for other Canadian performers at a time when there were limited recording opportunities for musicians in Canada.

   One of the top acts of the folk scene, Ian & Sylvia helped boost the careers of Gordon Lightfoot and Joni Mitchell with their recordings of “Early Morning Rain,” “For Lovin’ Me,” and “The Circle Game,” and they introduced outstanding songs of their own, including Sylvia’s “You Were on My Mind” and Ian’s “Someday Soon” and “Four Strong Winds.”

Photographs of Sylvia playing autoharp while Ian plays guitar are among the most romantic evocations of the coffeehouse era.

   “Their early Vanguard albums were an eclectic mix of traditional and contemporary folksongs, sung with a purity and clarity that was unusual, even in the stripped-down days of folk music”–Mary Katherine Aldin (liner notes to Long Long Time). Nowhere is this more apparent than on their debut album Ian & Sylvia (1962).

It is a confident recording featuring mainly traditional material like “Old Blue,” “Mary Anne,” “Un Canadien Errant,” and “Rambler Gambler.” The sound is fresh and the voices are well balanced on this historically important and highly recommended recording. Still a winner after all these years.

Source

Tracks

   1. You Were On My Mind 2:47
   2. Moonshine Can 2:16
   3. Jealous Lover , The 2:55 
   4. Four Rode By 2:42 
   5. Brave Wolfe 5:26
   6. Nova Scotia Farewell 2:51 
   7. Someday Soon 2:21
   8. Little Beggarman 2:23
   9. Texas Rangers 3:27
 10. Ghost Lover, The 2:46
 11. Captain Woodstock’s Courtship 2:56
 12. Green Valley 4:03  
 13. Swing Down, Chariot

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